40 Celebrities With Autism Who Have Gone On To Make Outstanding Achievements In Their Fields

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Autism can be a difficult thing to deal with – there’s no denying that. And, unfortunately, prejudice against people who have the condition is still rife. But perhaps things are slowly beginning to change, as those with autism speak out and share their stories of success. Being on the autistic spectrum doesn’t prevent you from doing great things – and the following celebrities prove it.

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40. Alexis Wineman

Alexis Wineman made history in 2013 when she became the first openly autistic person to compete in Miss America. That very feat led her to tell ABC News about her childhood, which had been blighted with fear of being marked out as different. “Growing up, I barely hung out with anyone. And that’s because I was afraid of being laughed at,” Wineman explained. Officially, the former pageant contestant was given a diagnosis of PDD-NOS – Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified – which puts her on the autistic spectrum.

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In 2018 Wineman wrote an essay for PopSugar which took the form of a letter to her younger self. It didn’t always make for easy reading, particularly as she detailed the time her own science teacher threw a cruel word at her. But she concluded, “People will continue to doubt your abilities, and that teacher is not going to be the last person to call you ‘retarded.’ But what happens in these coming years is for you to decide. No one has any power over you or what you do.”

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39. Matt Savage

While young, jazz pianist Matt Savage received a diagnosis of autism – explaining, in turn, why he couldn’t cope with loud noises. However, the condition didn’t put a stop to his musical prowess. At just six years old, in fact, he learnt how to interpret piano scores. Then, at the age of nine, he recorded his own album. Now, Savage is known as an “autistic savant,” meaning he’s an individual with highly impressive skills indeed.

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Savage’s parents Larry and Diane were always supportive of him. In 2018 Diane told the Democrat and Chronicle, “He instigated everything. We just followed his lead.” And that worked out wonderfully. The young musician has now performed with, among others, Jackson Browne and Chaka Khan. And possibly even bigger things are in his future.

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38. Anne Hegerty

Anne Hegerty – one of the stars of the British version of the game show The Chase – has Asperger syndrome, and she appears more than happy to talk about her condition. When she competed in the 2018 series of British reality series I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here!, for example, she spoke openly about her diagnosis. And, charmingly, one little boy with autism even sent Hegerty a letter saying that he wanted to be just like her when he grows up.

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The child, Joseph Hughes, told Hegerty, “Some people are mean to me because I am autistic, but watching you makes me see that other people can have autism too and maybe I can have a cool job like you when I am older.” The letter went viral. And there was subsequently an outpouring of support for Hegerty and her young fan.

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37. Haley Moss

Author Haley Moss was diagnosed with autism at the age of three, with a doctor telling her parents that she may never even speak. But now Moss has attended college, written books for other autistic students and worked as an advocate. And perhaps her greatest achievement to date arrived in 2019, when she became an attorney. At Moss’ swearing-in ceremony, moreover, her new boss called her “a pioneer in neuro-diversity.”

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At that time, Moss spoke to the Associated Press about her achievement. She said, “I’m very passionate about things I enjoy and I love to write. That’s also part of why I went to law school, and I love to be able to help others. So even with writing, I love that I’m able to express myself completely and what I can say has the ability to help someone else.” Now she’s in a position to help plenty.

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36. Robert White

Jokester Robert White ended up finishing in second place when he competed on the 2018 season of Britain’s Got Talent. And head judge Simon Cowell liked him a lot, telling White on camera that he was “very unique… very quirky [and] very funny.” White’s never made a secret of his autism, though. The now-established comedian sells himself as “the only gay, Aspergic, quarter-Welsh comic on the British comedy circuit.”

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For Autism Awareness Week in 2019, White released a song about his feelings towards his condition. That same April he did an interview with Attitude magazine. Here, he stated, “My voice is for anyone for whom fitting in may be a struggle because of autism or other invisible disabilities, or any other reason.”

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35. Tim Ellis

Tim Ellis is a big name in magic. The Australian performer has been immersed in the world of illusions since the age of 14, when he became the youngest ever member of the Magic Circle of Victoria. Nowadays, Ellis continues to bedazzle audiences on stage and TV – and with his Asperger’s actually incorporated into his work. After being diagnosed in 2007, he made a new show called Aspycadabra which was about his experiences of the condition.

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According to the official description, Aspycadabra tackles questions including, “Are “Aspies” really the next evolution of humankind? Are they real life X-Men? Can you really explain Asperger’s syndrome with a deck of cards?” Indeed, perhaps Ellis can. The show is all about detailing aspects of autism to people who don’t yet understand it.

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34. Stephen Wiltshire

British artist Stephen Wiltshire was diagnosed with autism aged three. Unable to speak until he was nine, he nonetheless has a rare and spectacular talent. After just one quick viewing of a city, he can perfectly draw it from memory – and the art he produces is beautiful to boot. Wiltshire has been celebrated for his work, too. In 2006 he was made a Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.

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In 2017 Wiltshire gave an interview – with the help of his sister Annette – to The Guardian. He explained, “I started drawing at the age of three, as communication was not an option for me at the time until the age of five, so this was my form of language.” Now his amazing drawings are sold worldwide for very high prices.

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33. Freddie Odom

There aren’t an awful lot of openly autistic politicians. But when Freddie Odom became mayor of Bluffton, Georgia, he was the first elected official in America to say that they’d been diagnosed as autistic. And the public servant has since opened up about his life in his unusually titled memoir They Can Kill Me, But They Can’t Eat Me.

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In the foreword, Odom dedicates the book to “my greatest mentor, autism.” And then he writes, “Autism, ever since I first figured out that we were together, I’ve had to go back through my life story and sort out all the mayhem that you’ve caused! (But, we’re already married, so we might as well learn how to live well together.)”

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32. Daryl Hannah

Yes, Daryl Hannah – the actress who won millions of hearts in 1984’s Splash – is an autistic person. The star was first diagnosed as a child. At this point, her doctor told her mother that Hannah should be put into an institution. “I am so thankful that she didn’t allow that,” Hannah said to Dan Rather in 2014. So is the rest of the world.

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The intervention of Hannah’s mother helped matters immensely. The young girl was taken out of school and allowed to take some time off. Hannah began to take an interest in acting, then. In 2015 she told The Australian Women’s Weekly, “I was about 11 when I understood that movies weren’t something that just happened in reality and someone caught it on camera. Once I realized that it was actually a job I could have, I actively pursued it.” And she was, of course, successful.

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31. Caiseal Mór

Fantasy author Caiseal Mór was diagnosed as autistic when he was young. But he only publicly came out about his condition in 2007. That year, he told blogger Donna Williams that he’d “been taught to be ashamed of [his] autism” and that he perceived that he was ultimately “going to end up in a mental hospital.” This mindset was something it took Mór a long time to overcome, too.

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In an interview with blogger Candral in 2018, Mór declared, “There’s more to me than autism. I had to learn to survive in this hostile world using only the gifts I was given. I have a degree in Theatre Performance and Practice. I’ve travelled almost everywhere on Earth. I’ve managed to write 13 novels, three non-fiction books and two graphic novels – as well as my music. I really believe you can achieve anything you want to if you make up your mind to do so.”

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30. Clay Marzo

Surfing champion Clay Marzo was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome in 2007. With that, a lot of things his competitors had noticed about him made more sense. Marzo often rubs his hands together, for instance. He is also known to play with his hair and to be honest to a fault with people. But his perfectionism – another characteristic typical of those with Asperger syndrome – helped him get where he is today.

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In 2015 Marzo released a book about his life with autism. While promoting it he told GrindTV, “I hope the book will help other people who are similar to me, and if not them, then to their families so they can get a better understanding of what it can be like.” He added, “Now that’s it done, though, I just want to go surfing. I’m much happier in the water.”

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29. Daniel Tammet

Daniel Tammet, who has Asperger syndrome, is famous for his incredible memory. Indeed, he supposedly became proficient in Icelandic after only studying it for a week. And he’s even invented his own language called “Mänti.” According to researcher Darold Treffert, Tammet is one of only a few people in the world who can be classified as a “prodigious savant.”

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In 2012 The Guardian asked Tammet if his diagnosis was a relief. He answered, “A huge relief, because I could stop feeling guilty. Guilty about not going to university. I didn’t have many friends and I also blamed that on myself, for being lazy or cack-handed. But now, with the diagnosis, I knew that I had developed differently.”

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28. Adam Young

The lead singer of Owl City believes that he has Asperger syndrome – although he hasn’t yet been professionally diagnosed. Still, some of his behaviors apparently chime with those exhibited by other people with the condition. “I don’t need to be in a social situation for very long to get what I need from it,” Young told City Pages in 2012. “When I’m home, I can close the door. I can stay inside my house and not leave if I don’t want to.”

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There’s no denying that Young has been incredibly successful. His single “Fireflies” went platinum six times – and that’s just for starters. Owl City appears on the soundtrack of many popular movies including Wreck-It Ralph and The Smurfs 2. All that, and his fans see him as a role model for people with Asperger’s.

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27. Dan Aykroyd

Believe it or not, but Dan Aykroyd’s Asperger syndrome apparently led him to create perhaps his best-loved movie. “One of my [Asperger’s] symptoms included my obsession with ghosts and law enforcement,” the actor told the Daily Mail in 2013. “I became obsessed by Hans Holzer, the greatest ghost hunter ever. That’s when the idea of my film Ghostbusters was born.”

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Aykroyd was also diagnosed with Tourette’s when he was 12 years old, a syndrome thought to be associated with autism. He explained to the Mail, “I had physical tics, nervousness and made grunting noises and it affected how outgoing I was. I had therapy which really worked and by 14 my symptoms eased.”

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26. Tony DeBlois

Tony DeBlois is a blind, autistic musical savant with a particular talent for jazz. The word “talent” perhaps understates his sheer gifts, though. DeBelois can apparently play 20 different instruments, and he’s also said to have committed thousands of musical pieces to memory. His life story is so impressive, in fact, that in 1997 it was made into TV movie Journey of the Heart.

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In 2003 expert Dr. Darold Treffert told the Boston Globe, “Among savants, Tony is remarkable. Most savants are expert at replication. That is, they have the sensational ability to duplicate what they hear – but it tends to be literal. What distinguishes Tony is his capacity to improvise, and that’s what you hear when he plays jazz.” And he’s still going strong.

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25. Matthew Labyorteaux

Given the developmental delays caused by his autism, Little House on the Prairie’s Matthew Labyorteaux was once written off by doctors. But the child star went on to great success, of course. This was both in Little House and as a voice actor in the likes of Mulan and Yu-Gi-Oh! GX.

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In 1978 Labyorteaux’s mother Frances Marshall described to People magazine the moment a casting director asked him if he would audition for an advert. She said, “I was panicked. He would throw a tantrum if anyone touched him. But Matthew just got up and followed her into the room.” The rest is history.

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24. James Durbin

Musician James Durbin – who first shot to fame after appearing on the 2011 season of American Idol – has both Asperger syndrome and Tourette’s. And now that he’s in the public eye, he wants people to see him as a role model. “I had no one to look up to like this growing up,” Durbin told People in 2016. “When I was a kid, I knew I was different… But now I want to be living proof that different is awesome.”

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By 2017 Durbin was married with children and serving as the new frontman for the band Quiet Riot. He told ABC that year, “My diagnosis, my disability doesn’t disable me from being happy… Whatever challenges you’re facing right now, they don’t define you. Because figuring out who you are takes a long time.”

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23. Mikey Brannigan

As a child, autistic Paralympian Mikey Brannigan raced everywhere just to expend some energy. In adulthood, though, that penchant for running served him well, as he scooped a gold medal in the 1,500 meters at the 2016 Paralympics. “In my experience, autistic people all have a tremendous gift,” his mother Edie told the Team USA website in the year of her son’s victory. “It’s a matter of finding that gift and nurturing it.”

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Edie thinks her son could make it to the Olympics eventually, and Brannigan himself agrees with her. In 2014 he told NBC, “I want to be a professional athlete. I had a dream – a daydream of [the Olympics]. Wearing my USA jersey, and representing my country… and the whole nation… a whole America watching me.”

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22. Susan Boyle

When Susan Boyle appeared on Britain’s Got Talent in 2009, people were blown away by her performance of “I Dreamed a Dream.” After the Scottish singer had achieved worldwide success, though, she found out that she had Asperger syndrome. And she ultimately revealed her diagnosis in 2013.

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That year, Boyle spoke to The Guardian. She said, “It will not make any difference to my life. It’s just a condition that I have to live with and work through.” But she also added, “I think people will treat me better because they will have a much greater understanding of who I am and why I do the things I do.”

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21. Example

Elliot Gleave, a.k.a. British musician Example, always knew that he was different. “I was diagnosed with Asperger’s when I was younger. I was amazing with numbers, I had a photographic memory, and I hated reading fiction,” he told The Guardian in 2012. His song “Come Taste the Rainbow” also features the lyrics, “Constant curses just get worse and worse/With a bit of Asperger’s.”

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Example has also suffered from drug addiction. He told the newspaper, “Coke, ketamine, MDMA – I’m just saying, all the things I tried didn’t make me a better person because I’m already mad when I’m sober.” It’s thought that people with autism are significantly more likely to have an addiction disorder.

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20. Chris Packham

British TV presenter Chris Packham doesn’t mind describing the consequences of his Asperger syndrome. “I experience the world in hyper-reality,” he told the Radio Times in 2018. “Sensory overload is a constant distraction.” But the naturalist is nevertheless incredibly successful. In addition to multiple awards for his TV work, in 2019 he was appointed as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

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Packham actually did a whole documentary about autism in 2017, titled Chris Packham: Asperger’s and Me. It was very candid – Packham even told the audience of how he had once considered suicide. The media praised the presenter for his bravery in releasing the show, with the Telegraph saying, “He deserves to become even more of a cult hero after this courageous film.”

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19. Travis Meeks

Travis Meeks, lead singer of Days of the New, hasn’t been shy about getting personal with his fans. For instance, he once wrote on his MySpace page, “I am a lot of things. I am a recovering addict. I have Asperger syndrome, [and] I am a good person.” Sadly, though, drug addiction has continued to trouble him. In 2017 he was apprehended for allegedly being in possession of a controlled substance.

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Yet despite the arrest, there’s no doubt that Meeks has had a lot of success. He was signed to a label at the age of only 17, and his band’s song “Touch, Peel and Stand” was met with plenty of acclaim. And reportedly, according to sources on the internet, he’s beginning to get over his substance abuse problems.

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18. Niall Aslam

Niall Aslam, a contestant on the incredibly popular British reality series Love Island, made waves when he left that show in 2018 for “personal reasons.” By way of explanation, he later revealed on Instagram that he is autistic. “I think it is important that I come forward,” Aslam wrote on the social media site. The U.K.’s National Autistic Society later praised him for speaking up.

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In his Instagram post Aslam wrote, “Growing up was extremely difficult for me and I often felt out of place. I always felt that people didn’t understand me, yet I was afraid to reveal my true scales as I did not want the label or stigma that was attached to it.” Now, he’s working on a book about his journey with Asperger’s syndrome.

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17. Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin is something of a pioneer. After all, she was one of the first people to speak openly about her experiences of autism. Not only that, but she ultimately improved lives by creating the “hug box,” a machine designed to provide a feeling of sensory stimulation in otherwise hypersensitive autistic people. It’s perhaps no surprise, then, that Grandin became the subject of a 2010 biopic titled Temple Grandin.

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Grandin is 72 years old now and still working. In 2018 she published a book called Calling All Minds: How to Think and Create Like an Inventor. Within it, she wrote, “Though our brains may work in different ways, there is no limit to the kinds of contributions we can make.”

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16. Guy Martin

After daredevil biker Guy Martin was taken to a medical professional, he was told that he had Asperger syndrome. But according to Martin himself, the diagnosis hasn’t affected him much. “It hasn’t changed anything. It just confirms why I do certain things in a certain way,” he told the Daily Mirror in 2015. Indeed, it appears that he’s often more concerned about his dangerous stunts than about his condition.

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In 2018 Martin told The Sunday Times Magazine, “The way I look at it is that maybe having that is why I am the way I am. Maybe that is all down to the autistic side. I don’t know. If there are any benefits to having it, it’s that you just get your head down and get on with things… It’s probably what helps me with endurance racing on my mountain bike.”

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15. Craig Nicholls

Australian musician Craig Nicholls, best known for fronting The Vines, had his Asperger syndrome revealed in court. That’s right; in 2004, during a hearing concerning the alleged assault of a photographer, the rock star’s diagnosis was made public. However, news that Nicholls is on the autistic spectrum came as something of a relief to the man himself. “It was more like an explanation,” he told The Guardian in 2006.

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In 2014 The Guardian asked Nicholls, “How has your life changed since being diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome in 2004?” He answered, “It’s made me want to be at home more – less touring and less socializing. I do like it, I just find it very difficult. For the song-writing and recording it works out really good.”

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14. Greta Thunberg

Climate activist Greta Thunberg is changing the world at just 16 years old. Such is her fame that she’s had documentaries made about her, been named one of the world’s most influential people by Time magazine, and was even nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 2019. And she also happens to have Asperger’s syndrome.

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Whenever people use Thunberg’s disorder to mock her, she bites back. In August 2019 she wrote on her Twitter, “When haters go after your looks and differences, it means they have nowhere left to go. And then you know you’re winning! I have Asperger’s and that means I’m sometimes a bit different from the norm. And – given the right circumstances – being different is a superpower.”

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13. Vernon Smith

As a professor and the joint winner of the 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, Vernon L. Smith is a successful person by anyone’s standards. And he credits his achievements, in part, to Asperger syndrome. “I don’t have any trouble thinking outside the box… And so I have been more open to different ways of looking at a lot of the problems in economics,” Smith told CNBC in 2005.

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In that interview, Smith went on to say, “Certain mental deficiencies may actually have some selective advantages in terms of activities.” He added, “We’ve lost a lot of the barriers that have to do with skin color and with various other characteristics. But there’s still not sufficient recognition of mental diversities. And we don’t all have to think alike to be communal and to live in a productive and satisfying world.”

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12. Vincent D’Onofrio

Daredevil actor Vincent D’Onofrio has used his experiences of autism to advocate for those with the same condition. “I know that I’m not normal, and that I couldn’t do what I do if my mind worked like some of my friends’,” he said in 2011 during a presentation about his yet-to-be-released film Johnny and Me. This film, as it happens, has a man with Asperger’s as its protagonist.

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Nobody could ever deny that D’Onofrio is a very successful actor. Among the famous movies he’s starred in are Full Metal Jacket, Men in Black and Jurassic World – plus he’s an Emmy nominee and a Saturn Award winner. Indeed, it seems that he absolutely hasn’t let anything hold him back.

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11. Ladyhawke

Singer Ladyhawke, a.k.a. Pip Brown, has used her Asperger syndrome to reach out to others. “I only have a very mild form of [the condition], and there are some people who have it so bad that they find it too hard to even write me a message,” she told the BBC in 2008. “I love that I’ve been able to talk to people and be able to relate like that.”

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Ladyhawke continued, “People shouldn’t be scared of [Asperger’s] or anything. Some people don’t even realize that they have it. I went through my whole life not knowing until only a few years ago, when it was just doing my head in and I had to get help.” Indeed, autism sometimes goes unnoticed in adults.

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10. Peter Tork

Monkees star Peter Tork revealed his diagnosis in a 2008 interview with This Is Derbyshire. “One thing I have discovered in recent years is that I suffer from Asperger syndrome – a form of autism,” he said. “There is a fanaticism and obsessiveness about me and my actions that appear to bear this out.” Maybe that’s why he’s got a musical legacy that most people would kill for.

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Sadly, Tork passed away in February 2019 from a rare form of cancer known as adenoid cystic carcinoma. His official Facebook then released a statement to fans. It said, “Please know that Peter was extremely appreciative of you, his Torkees, and one of his deepest joys was to be out in front of you, playing his music, and seeing you enjoy what he had to share.”

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9. Paddy Considine

Hot Fuzz actor Paddy Considine was told that he had Asperger syndrome at the age of 36 – and the diagnosis seemingly helped him, too. “Naming my problem has helped me a lot,” he told The Daily Telegraph in 2011. “It’s allowed me to make sense of so many things I didn’t understand before and is allowing me to move forward with my life.”

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Speaking to the Telegraph, Considine said, “saying nothing was tempting” when it came to his condition. But, he said, “Then I thought, if I’d read about the equivalent of me when I was 17 or 18, it might have helped me identify what was wrong so much earlier. And in the face of that, silence just seems wrong.”

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8. Heather Kuzmich

In 2007 Heather Kuzmich was one of the last five on the ninth cycle of America’s Next Top Model. And perhaps owing to Asperger’s syndrome, she would sometimes freeze up at important moments. But her bravery won her praise, and her career continued even after she failed to win the show. And as of early 2019, she’s a vice-president of development at youth support program YEP Nation.

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But Kuzmich didn’t always have a good time on America’s Next Top Model. At one point during the show, she said, “I wish I could get the joke.” Another participant then snapped, “You. You’re the joke.” But she overcame the bullying to become one of the most popular people on the show – and the successful person she is today.

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7. Gary Numan

“I do have Asperger syndrome,” musician Gary Numan told the world during a 2018 interview with The Irish News. But he didn’t consider it a negative. “On the whole, I think having Asperger’s has been a good thing,” the star added. “It’s given me a slightly different view of the world, and I truly believe it helped get me through some hard times.”

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Numan also talked about how he had been through depression. He said, “Unless you’ve actually suffered depression, it’s impossible to understand how it feels. I mean it’s no good telling someone to cheer up. That’s like trying to talk them out of having flu.” Reportedly, autistic people are four times more likely to experience that mental health problem.

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6. Andy Warhol

Pop artist Andy Warhol – the mind behind some of the most iconic images of the modern era – never confirmed that he was autistic. But in 1999 autism expert Dr. Judith Gould suggested that he probably had been on the spectrum. “It is fascinating how many of the things he did are typical of autism,” Gould told The Guardian. “Warhol almost certainly had Asperger syndrome.”

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These things “typical of autism” include difficulty recognizing familiar faces, social problems, minimal word use and a desire for things to be ordered and consistent. Warhol would always buy the same type and color of underwear, for example, declaring that green ones felt different. But one thing is for certain – he was an incredible artist.

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5. David Byrne

In 2006 Talking Heads frontman David Byrne revealed in a blog entry that he suspected he had had “borderline Asperger’s.” However, it’s unknown whether that has ever been diagnosed. Twelve years on, though, Byrne admitted in a Reddit AMA chat that he was “much more comfortable socially now than [he] used to be.”

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Speaking at WBUR’s CitySpace in 2019, Byrne said his friends had told him “about the spectrum of Asperger’s and autism.” This made him realize he most likely had it. “There’s a part where I felt very uncomfortable socially,” he said. “So I thought, ‘Okay, yes, I can see the wear fit on that. I identify with that.’”

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4. Dan Harmon

Interestingly, Dan Harmon first suspected that he had some form of autism when he was writing Community. To be specific, he considered whether Abed – the character played by Danny Pudi – had Asperger’s. And so he began researching the condition online. During Harmon’s investigation, he discovered that some often-seen traits of Asperger’s seemed familiar to him. A doctor subsequently confirmed that he was most likely on the spectrum.

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In a 2014 interview with Vice, Harmon said that even if he turned out not to have Asperger’s, “I relate to people who feel alienated. I relate to people who feel like they’re somehow fundamentally cut off from people on a level that ‘normal’ people take for granted.” He also added, “When I have conversations with my fans, we don’t mind staring at the corner of the table and just saying what we mean. It’s like communicating through one channel.”

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3. Satoshi Tajiri

If you’ve ever caught a Pokémon, then you have Satoshi Tajiri to thank. He’s the brains behind the mega-franchise that gave the world cuties such as Pikachu. And, yes, Tajiri is said to be autistic. In fact, it may even be that his condition inadvertently gave birth to the whole Pokémon phenomenon. As a child, he loved collecting bugs – and collecting is a common interest among autistic people. That passion reportedly spurred Tajiri on to give kids the same pleasure he experienced with his hobby.

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Back in 1999 Tajiri gave an interview to Time magazine. He said of his insect-collecting, “They fascinated me. For one thing, they kind of moved funny. They were odd. Every time I found a new insect, it was mysterious to me.” During the interview Tajiri’s father mentioned that his son was sometimes called “Dr. Bug” by other kids – but look at Dr. Bug now.

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2. Courtney Love

Famous rocker Courtney Love was reportedly diagnosed with autism when she was a child. And her early life was somewhat checkered. As she grew into adolescence, she became a tearaway and eventually ended up getting kicked out of her school. An arrest for shoplifting and a stint in juvie followed, too. Yet despite so many difficulties, Love eventually went on to become a punk icon.

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Love spoke about her childhood to Rolling Stone in 1994. She said, “When I talk about being introverted, I was diagnosed autistic. At an early age, I would not speak. Then I simply bloomed. My first visit to a psychiatrist was when I was, like, three. Observational therapy. TM for tots. You name it, I’ve been there.” But she got through it.

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1. Anthony Hopkins

Anthony Hopkins – who is widely considered to be one of the finest actors alive – happens to have Asperger’s. So perhaps the condition made him become the performer he is today? Well, when talking to the Daily Mail in 2017, Hopkins said of his mindset, “I definitely look at people differently. I like to deconstruct – to pull a character apart [and] work out what makes them tick.” Perhaps, then, Asperger’s has helped in that regard.

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That same year Hopkins said he believed having Asperger’s helped him with another great passion – art. He told The Desert Sun, “[A psychotherapist] put it back on the map that Asperger’s people tend to be creative or severely handicapped. I don’t know if that’s true of me, but I know I can never be restful. I tend to multi-task. I decide I’m not going to paint and then I’ll spend 24 hours painting.” Now, he does whole exhibitions of his work.

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